Land of Invention - Famous Scottish Inventors



Still_-_Land_of_Invention.jpg
Still from 'Land of Invention' - Taken from 'Films of Britain 1941'
'Scotland is a beautiful land, though rugged, and has been the nurse of many famous inventors. Macadam, creator of the macadamized [sic] road; Watt, who built the first locomotive engine; Murdock, who showed us how to light our cities with gas; Nasmyth, inventor of the steam-hammer; Telford, builder of the Caledonian canal; Henry Bell, who built the first steamship; Alexander Bell, the first man to transmit the human voice along an electric wire; Simpson, who developed the use of choloform; Ross, who conquered malaria; and a host of others whose greatness dwarfs the barren careers of modern dictators.' [1]

Date: 1941
Duration: 10:54

Director: Andrew Buchanan
Production Company: British Films Ltd
Producer: -
Cinematographer: Henry Cooper
Composer: -
Narration: John Selous
Editor: James Anderson
Sound Recording:

Length: 35mm: 1041ft. 16mm: 416ft.

'Western Electric'

Distributor: -



Still_-_Land_of_Invention_(42).jpg
Still from 'Land of Invention' - Taken from 'Films of Britain 1942-43'
Land of Invention
Production: Produced by Andrew Buchanan, of Films of Great Britain, Ltd.
Description: Direct photography with commentary.
Teaching Notes: Not available.
Distributors: The Central Film Library, Imperial Institute, South Kensington, SW7.
Distributors' Cat. Ref.: U.K. 101.
Owner of U.K. Rights: British Council.
Conditions of Supply: Loaned free of charge.
Contents: It is suggested that the ingenuity of the Scots has produced men with ideas. Among them are mentioned Macadam, creator of the modern road; Watt, who developed the steam-engine; Murdoch, creator of gas lighting; Nasmyth, maker of the steam-hammer; Telford, builder of the Caledonian Canal; Henry Bell, who built the first steamship; Alexander Bell, the first man to transmit the human voice along an electric wire; and Simpson, who developed the use of chloroform; ending with pictures of St. Andrew's House.
Appraisal: This film was made for the British Council primarily for distribution overseas. It is presented in an interesting manner and is illustrated by models and documents, such as a model of Watt's steam-engine and his note-book. The photography is good but the shot of the Forth Bridge in connection with Telford is a little misleading. It would be of interest to schools and clubs, and English as to whether a Scot was solely responsible for each of the inventions shown.
BACKGROUND FILMS VIEWING COMMITTEE
16mm. Sd.
416ft
11mins.
1 reel.[2]
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  1. ^ Films of Britain - British Council Film Department Catalogue - 1941
  2. ^ Monthly Film Bulletin of the BFI
    31st July 1945

    Educational Films
    Arts and Crafts