Indian Ocean



'This is an animated diagram film; by this technique it has been possible to illustrate the history of the Indian Ocean, from the time of its discovery to the present day in an effective and uncompounded manner.'[1]

Date: 1948
Duration: 22:--

In Technicolor.
Director: -
Production Company: G.B. Instructional
Producer: -
Cinematographer: -
Composer: -
Narration: -
Editor: -
Sound Recording: -

Length: 35mm: 1980ft. 16mm: 792ft.

Notes:

This film does not officially appear in the Films of Britain catalogues. It appears as typed amendment to the catalogue on a separate sheet fixed into the back of the 1946 catalogue, and suggests that the film had not yet been completed at the time of writing. However, it is not listed at all in the next edition of the catalogue (1947-50). This would normally suggest that the film was never completed, but it is known that the British Film Institute does indeed hold a copy of this title. It is possible, however, that it was never distributed.

Films_of_Britain_1946_-_Oceans.png
Sections of two typed amendment sheets found in the back of the 1946 edition of 'Films of Britain'


Its companion piece, Pacific Ocean, though also listed with Indian Ocean in the back of the 1946 Films of Britain catalogue, does however appear as a full entry in the 1947-50 edition.

In this respect, Indian Ocean bears a resemblance to Lincolnshire Poacher and Widdicombe Fair, which also appear as additions in the back of the 1946 Films of Britain catalogue, but not as proper entries in the 1947-50 edition.

Interestingly, despite definitely being produced by G.B. Instructional, neither Indian Ocean nor Pacific Ocean seem to appear in the G.B. Instructional's 1950 book Gaumont-British Educational Films, Filmstrips and Wall Charts.[2]
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  1. ^ Films of Britain - British Council Film Department Catalogue - 1946
  2. ^ All titles from this book listed as British Council films have been digitally recorded. Other titles have not. It is feasible that these titles do exist in the book, but are not listed correctly. This, however, seems unlikely.